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Тhere Where 12 Аbandoned Кittens Тhat Аre Discovered Freezing In Тhe Snow

The 14 inches of snow that buried Campbell County, Virginia, was a nuisance for most, but the cold conditions meant the difference between life and death for 12 young lives.

On December 12, as the light began to wane in the early evening, a passerby saw a metal container poking out of a snow pile. Because there were no houses nearby, the cage stood out like a sore thumb, alerting the Good Samaritan to the fact that something was seriously wrong.

As the visitor approached, she noticed six shivering cats within the crate, but the four small kittens outside the cage in the snow were much more concerning.

When animal control officer Melissa Labryer arrived on the scene, she quickly noticed the infants, who seemed to be 5 or 6 weeks old and were lifeless in the powdery substance. Labryer rushed to the nearest animal shelter with all of the cold cats in dry carriers.

“‘I’m in desperate need of assistance! According to Barbe Shackelford, head of Friends of Campbell County Animal Control, Labryer informed a shelter worker, “I have frozen kittens and I need some volunteers to aid me back at the shelter” (FOCCAC).

Shackelford told The Dodo, “Labryer indicated there were 12 cats in need of resurrection.” “As a result, the volunteer who received the call promptly sent out a call for help from any other members who managed to be connected into the Facebook Messenger chat group at the time.”

Volunteers immediately learned how to treat hypothermia and grabbed as many towels as possible. “We had a triage room set up for the cats within minutes of our arrival,” Shackelford added. “We began drying them right away, but we were particularly concerned about the four infants, who weighed less than a pound each and were quite chilly and damp. “They didn’t move.”

Volunteers immediately learned how to treat hypothermia and grabbed as many towels as possible. “We had a triage room set up for the cats within minutes of our arrival,” Shackelford added. “We began drying them right away, but we were particularly concerned about the four infants, who weighed less than a pound each and were quite chilly and damp. “They didn’t move.”

In the hopes of controlling their temperatures, the volunteers untucked their shirts and placed the kittens close to their skin with hot water bottles, and there were soon indications of life under the clothes. The abandoned cats were soon dry and grooming themselves as if nothing had occurred thanks to the fast intervention of the animal control officer and volunteers.

“By the time we had cleaned up and were ready to go, all the cats were purring and enjoying attention,” Shackelford recalled.

One of the group’s members, called “the frozen 12,” has already been adopted, and three others, Frenchie, Ring, and Swan, are on their way to finding their forever homes.

The road ahead is not yet clear for the four kittens discovered in the snow. “They’re eating well,” Shackelford observed, “but the tiniest one, the tiny black one with such expressive eyes, has had a setback and is extremely fragile.” “He’ll require TLC for a while before we’re certain he’ll make it through his ordeal.”

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